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Bettye Swann - The Complete Atlantic Recordings
Real Gone Music 2014 CD 18.00 €
South Coast Wolves with Tortilla Flat Trio - Ways & Chains CDEP
THE SOUTH COAST WOLVES with TORTILLA FLAT TRIO

NEW CD EP "WAYS & CHAINS" takes you to the world of soulful guitar and

harmonica driven R&B.

The record includes two band's own compositions and two Little Wille John

covers.



Helsinki area based The South Coast Wolves plays bluesy roots music. The

players has over 30 years long history in Helsinki's blues, R&B, and R'n'R

groups.

The core of the band is Nisse Lindström - vocals and Vesa Karppi - guitars.

The solid ground for the music is given by the great Tortilla Flat Trio:

Kari Kempas - harmonica, Juha Rantapuro - bass ja Honey Aaltonen - drums.
Galactic Records 2014 CD 8.00 €
VA: - Detroit Special - Motor City Roots 2CD
Following on from the success of our first two volumes in the Motor city Roots series comes, 'Detroit Special'.

Features the first two compilation albums ever released by the legendary Motown label plus 36 bonus tracks featuring the superb Motown artists: Barrett Strong; The Miracles; Mary Wells and more.

Also on offer here are many US chart hits from the likes of: Marvin Gaye and The Supremes plus some of the earliest recordings from such artists as: Martha Reeves; Stevie Wonder and once again The Miracles.

Fully detailed liner notes make this another great collector's item.
Jasmine Records 2014 CD 15.00 €
VA: - Dusty Heard Them Here First
Dusty Springfield had exceptional taste. Her song choices were always consistently high in quality, and she wasn’t afraid to look to long-forgotten B-sides, demos and album tracks for material. Given her reputation for perfection, it’s no surprise there were so few duds in her catalogue. That so much of it was culled from American soul and R&B artists may be news to many. As Malcolm Baumgart writes in the booklet, “Dusty’s expertise as an interpretive singer prevented her from being viewed as a cover artist,” and it’s hard to believe songs such as ‘Am I the Same Girl?’ and ‘Now That You’re My Baby’ were not written exclusively for the British icon. Britain had a history of pulling from America’s R&B, soul and pop stashes, but whereas groups such as the Beatles, Herman’s Hermits and the Moody Blues gave their American covers a very British slant, Dusty’s interpretations sounded neither overtly British nor American. It all just sounded like Dusty. It’s hard to think of another singer able to so effortlessly and convincingly claim so many top-notch covers as their own.

“Dusty Heard Them Here First” compiles 24 US songs that Dusty covered during her long career. A quick peek at the tracklist reveals her unabashed affection for soul. She wore her love of Motown loud and proud, taking on heavy-hitters such as the Velvelettes’ ‘Needle In A Haystack’, the Miracles’ ‘You’ve Really Got A Hold On Me’ and Marvin Gaye’s ‘Can I Get A Witness’. She also idolised Baby Washington, covering four songs from her repertoire, including ‘Doodlin’’ featured here. Compiler Mick Patrick also notes Dusty’s fondness for songwriters Carole King and Gerry Goffin, writing, “Dusty cut enough numbers from [their] catalogue to fill an entire LP”. The Honey Bees’ original of Goffin and King’s ‘Some Of Your Lovin’’ is a tough one to beat, but Dusty came very, very close. Her decision to cover Norma Tanega’s ‘No Stranger Am I’ was likely due to more than just her interest in the song. Norma and Dusty were dating at the time she recorded this for the B-side of ‘I Close My Eyes And Count To Ten’ in 1968. By the 70s she was tapping Evie Sands and Lesley Gore for material. It’s easy to hear why she selected Lesley’s ‘Love Me By Name’, so powerful and full of feeling. But then again, the same can be said for ‘Turn Me Around’ (Chi Coltrane), ‘Packin’ Up’ (Margie Hendrix), ‘Every Ounce Of Strength’ (Carla Thomas) and practically every single song on “Dusty Heard Them Here First”. This is one of those rare instances when it’s just too tough to choose between original and cover; both are wonderful, you be the judge.



By Sheila Burgel (Ace Records)

Ace Records 2014 CD 18.00 €
VA: - Hall Of Fame Vol. 3
Our Fame vault excavation continues to be the gift that keeps on giving for southern soul fans. And what better way could there be to start another soul-filled year than with a new volume of “Hall Of Fame”. The previous two volumes of the series presented a cross-section of exceptional, and mostly unissued, material from the vaults of Fame studios from the prime years of Rick Hall’s funky building on Avalon Avenue in Muscle Shoals. The previous volumes mixed male and female vocalists and added a smattering of groups, but this one concentrates on the recordings by the great male singers who passed through Fame’s doors in the mid to late 60s.

A sizeable portion of the tracks featured here only came to light during our ongoing research. Most of the artists have appeared previously in our series and will need no further introduction, but it’s a pleasure to be able to add to their number by bringing you thrilling selections from Herman Moore, Billy & Clyde, Dan Brantley and Roy Lee Johnson.

How good and how pleasant it is to be able to again bring you almost two dozen fine slabs of vintage southern soul on CD for the first time. Almost all of them date from the period that most would consider to be Fame’s golden era for soul (1966-68), and the few that don’t are just as compelling. 20 of the 24 have never been issued in any form until now. The release of this third volume concludes the “Hall Of Fame” series but not of Ace’s Fame reissue programme, I’m happy to say. There are still several more projects in the pipeline, so you can look forward to musical visits to Northern Alabama for some while yet.

By Tony Rounce (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2014 CD 18.00 €
VA: - Just For A Day - The Apollo Records Story 3CD
Apollo Records came from humble beginnings but, through the hard work and dedication of its founders, it became an influential record label in America during the Forties and Fifties. New York-based Apollo went toe-to-toe with larger labels in the era to break artists across numerous genres, most notably doo-wop, gospel and blues, in its near-two decade existence.

Born in the Rainbow Record Shop in downtown Harlem, near the theatre whose name it would share, Apollo Records was founded by husband-and-wife duo Isaac and Bess Berman, along with colleagues Hy Siegel and Sam Schneider. It was Bess who drove the label from the off, taking responsibility for the day-to-day running of Apollo despite Siegel’s initial role of President.

The label’s location amid arguably the country’s most vibrant music scene meant it unearthed gems from the off – and none was more precious than Dinah Washington. The woman who would become known as ‘Queen of the Juke Boxes’ cut a number of tracks for Apollo during its earliest years.

Among the numbers recorded by the 21-year old were ‘Mellow Mama Blues’ (disc one), ‘My Voot Is Really Vout’ (disc three) and ‘Pacific Coast Blues’ (disc two). Even on her maiden studio outing, the young Washington displayed a talent and a soulfulness that belied her age. She would soon be snapped up by the larger Mercury Records and became one of the most influential artists of her time.

Another future superstar to cut their teeth for Apollo was Wynonie Harris, an R&B powerhouse and founding figure of rock ‘n’ roll. Having travelled the United States in a bid to establish himself, Harris turned up at – of all places – the Apollo Theatre in Harlem in the mid Forties. Among the tracks Harris recorded for the label were ‘I Gotta Lyin' Woman’, ‘Young And Wild’ and ‘She's Gone With The Wind’; all three can be found on this collection. The musicians’ strike of 1942-44 postponed Harris’ success, and he went on to enjoy a string of R&B chart-topping hits on both the Decca and King labels.

Artists had to make their name through live performance and public appearances if they wanted to get noticed. Such was the tactic of 35-year old Mahalia Jackson, who arrived at Apollo in 1946.

Jackson wasted no time in justifying the lofty moniker of ‘Queen of Gospel’, bestowed upon her as she played the circuit. In 1948 she recorded and released ‘Move On Up A Little Higher’, which sold eight million. Apollo struggled to meet demand and Bess Berman soon deposed Siegel as head of the label. Jackson would stay at Apollo for nearly a decade, recording tracks such as ‘She Said It Would’ (disc three) and ‘Nobody Knows The Trouble I’ve Seen’ (disc one) before departing for Columbia in 1954 and going on to win four Grammy awards.

But it wasn’t just solo stars that made it on Apollo. Bess Berman showed she was adept at spotting collective talent when she renamed gospel vocal group the Selah Jubilee Singers the Larks in 1950. They went on to bag a number of Top 10 R&B hits, including ‘Little Side Car’ (disc three) in ’51. Buoyed by this success, Berman took another gospel group, the Royal Sons Quintet, and rechristened them the Five Royales. They would enjoy even greater success, most notably with ‘Dedicated To The One I Love’, a track that would go on to hit for both the Shirelles and the Mamas and the Papas in the Sixties.

While the name of the game was commercial success, characters like ‘Champion’ Jack Dupree gave Apollo a large helping of credibility. A gritty and authentic musician who loved his trade, the veteran New Orleans-born singer-pianist was renowned for his witty lyricism and gritty tone. He cut about a dozen country-blues tracks for Apollo, including ‘Deacon’s Party’, ‘Old Woman Blues’ (both disc one) and ‘Come Back Baby’ (disc three), but would achieve greater success on Atlantic.

With a mixture of cult, critical and commercial success, Apollo maintained a respectable output across the Forties and Fifties. But the early Sixties were blighted by Bess’ ill health and copyright lawsuits pertaining to Apollo’s crediting of Mahalia Jackson recordings. It was ultimately, however, the departure of artists like Jackson, the Five Royales and Wynonie Harris to other labels that proved too much for Apollo, which shut its doors in 1962.

But Bess Berman could look back on her work in that period and be proud, not least of the achievement of becoming the first woman to head a record label in a male-dominated era. More than that, this three-disc selection, with its assortment of artists and musical genres, illustrates the strength of the label’s catalogue in all its glory.
One Day Music 2014 2-CD 9.00 €
VA: - Kent's Cellar Of Soul Vol. 3
We present for your delectation 26 mid to late 60s classic soul tracks, only six of which are currently on Ace CDs. Inevitably many are uptempo but the CD is designed to capture the spirit of 60s soul rather than its later UK dance-centric revision. Several were R&B hits and a few made the Pop Hot 100 too. Most were released in the UK, some on groovy little labels such as Action, Spark, Soul City, Direction, B&C and Pama. They were the type of records the pirate radio stations would plug from their off-shore floating studios. It was mod music in the sense of new, hip and in the groove, rather than of any elite, exclusive in-crowd. If it was groovy you bought it.

I remember exotic names such as Cliff Nobles & Co, the Maskman & the Agents and Peggy Scott & Jo Jo Benson being raved about on the radio. When you got your newly released records home you’d play the top side a few times and then try out the flip – always a worthwhile exercise. With the Show Stoppers you got ‘What Can A Man Do’ as a big, big bonus.

Fellow compiler Tony Rounce and I grew up in the exciting times of late 60s Britain, so it is inevitable that this compilation has some Anglo Saxon nuances. Gene Latter was born in Wales and his great 60s soul pastiche ‘Sign On The Dotted Line’ was recorded in London. It gained a US release on Liberty but it was the spins in the clubs of the UK on the Spark label that won it admirers who danced to its gritty grooves. The Show Stoppers also found fame through the UK clubs and went to #11 with their ‘House Party’ top-side without even denting the US R&B charts. Brenton Wood had a hit on all the record sales listings, but surprisingly reached the highest over here.

Cliff Nobles’ ‘The Horse’ was an instrumental that had that indefinable something which made it stand out from the rest; there are probably legions of fans who never knew the song’s title. Bill Moss’ funky ‘Sock It To ‘Em Soul Brother’ is a fine example of early rap and something of a period piece with it’s eulogising of OJ Simpson for his football rather than courtroom skills. Jesse James’ first R&B hit ‘Believe In Me Baby’ didn’t get a UK release; possibly just as well as there are some heavy sexual problems featured towards the end.

There’s girly group soul from the Ikettes and Inspirations, funky stuff from Clarence Carter, Thelma Jones and Lowell Fulsom and soulful balladry from Carl Henderson, the Ad Libs and Bob & Earl. The soul group roots of Northern Soul are demonstrated by the Platters, Esquires, Showmen and Volumes, while Ruby Andrews and J.J. Barnes feature the subtler productions that were the foundation stones of the 70s modern soul scene.

No false categories are needed; it’s all truly great soul music that will be appreciated by any music lover.



By Ady Croasdell (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2014 CD 18.00 €
VA: - Let The Music Play - Black America Sings Bacharach & David
Our “Black America Sings…” series has already turned the soulful spotlight on the compositions of Bob Dylan, Lennon & McCartney and Otis Redding. Now it’s the turn of Bacharach and David.

Burt Bacharach’s music and the lyrics of Hal David have been appreciated by black American artists for over 50 years. Dionne Warwick was the first to record many of their songs and by doing so made them visible to others as a source of hits or album tracks. The pair had no finer interpreter than Warwick– with the possible exception of her male counterpart Lou Johnson – but all the acts included here demonstrate the quality of their work.

The song titles here speak for themselves, and the reputations of the artists are enough to guarantee quality performances. Every listener will have their own favourites. I have more than a few, but am especially fond of Dionne Warwick’s original demo of ‘Make It Easy On Yourself’, Ruby & the Romantics’ ‘I Cry Alone’ and Isaac Hayes’ elegant elongation of ‘I Just Don’t Know What To Do With Myself’. There are many other highlights, but if these three tracks can’t sell you on the project, nothing will.

Plans are underway to extend the “Black America Sings…” series, with the next instalment due later this year. In the meantime, here are two dozen of Bacharach and David’s best-known compositions performed by some of the finest soul artists of the 1960s and 70s.

By Tony Rounce (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2014 CD 18.00 €
VA: - One In A Million - The Songs Of Sam Dees
Surely the greatest endorsement for any songwriter is the calibre of artists who record their compositions. Sam Dees can boast cuts on acts such as the Temptations, Johnnie Taylor, Gladys Knight & the Pips, Millie Jackson, Jackie Wilson and other upper echelon soul stars. Having previously issued two CDs of Sam’s recordings, we felt he was overdue for an entry in our Songwriter series. The aptly titled “One In A Million” is exactly that.

The CD takes its title from what is probably his most commercially successful song, thanks to Larry Graham’s chart-topping recording from 1980, and covers Sam’s career from the late 1960s through to the mid-80s. Whittling his catalogue down to a representative 22 songs was a challenge and a half. Many of the artists featured, such as Loleatta Holloway and John Edwards, returned to Sam’s songbook again and again, while others drew from it only once or twice. The common denominator between them is they all recognised a great song when they heard it.

There’s a preponderance of titles from the period Sam’s most ardent admirers seem to like best, the mid-70s, but we’ve not neglected the early 80s, when his compositions were recorded by some of the biggest names in soul and records bearing his name under the title were starting to sell in their millions.

The only disappointment for Sam’s fans is his career as a singer has always been somewhat fragmented due to the demand for his songs. As a demonstration of his vocal greatness we have included his 1977 recording of ‘My World’, a song he performs so definitively that it’s hardly surprising to find his is the only version.

“One In A Million” presents the sublime songs of Sam Dees in performances that will live on in the hearts and collections of his army of fans. Some will be better known than others, but all will surely be admired and cherished in the same way the man who wrote them is.

By Tony Rounce (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2014 CD 18.00 €
VA: - Sweet Soul Music 1971
1-CD Digipak (6-plated) with 76-page booklet, 26 tracks. Total playing time approx. 85 mns.

• The eagerly anticipated finale to Bear Family's earlier ‘Sweet Soul Music’ volumes, and the award-winning 'Blowin' The Fuse' R&B series.
• Taken together, these classic series tell the story of R&B-Soul-Funk from 1945-1975, year-by-year, song-by-song. These are the records that made a difference. A HUGE difference!
• This is the sound that still influences today’s R&B and Soul and Rap, plus musicians like Amy Winehouse and Janelle Monae and revivalists like James Hunter, who weren’t even born when these records came out!
• All the greatest and most influential soul-funk hits of the early 1970s, including some surprisingly hard-to-find selections! Every song is the original version, painstakingly remastered for finest sound!
• Massive, beautifully illustrated booklets with detailed notes, incredible vintage photos, and ephemera.
• But, sadly, the story ends here. The last track, Boogie Fever, heralds the dawn of Disco.

As Soul morphed into Funk, it became the soundtrack to a social and musical revolution. The riveting story of the 1960s in Soul music was told in full for the first time on Bear Family's earlier 'Sweet Soul Music' volumes. Now the story continues to our conclusion in 1975. Some record companies have compiled anthologies from their own vaults, but Bear Family has gone the extra mile... and then some, licensing classic recordings from EVERY record label at the epicenter of ‘70s soul and funk to arrive at the ultimate collection of greatest hits and finest performances from the era’s biggest stars and neglected heroes.

The final five volumes, available now, cover the years 1971-1975. The music was changing rapidly thanks to Motown, Stax, Muscle Shoals, and the funk revolution, led by James Brown and Sly & The Family Stone. The messages at the heart of the music were often as powerful and incendiary as the grooves themselves. Bill Dahl’s track-by-track commentary provides extensive biographical info on every artist on every disc.

The prelude to this series, 'Blowin' The Fuse,' definitively covered the history of R&B from 1945- 1960, garnering awards and wide acclaim. The first ten volumes of ‘Sweet Soul Music’ earned the same enthusiastic response. Now here comes the final installment of ‘Sweet Soul Music,’ compiled with love by Dave 'Daddy Cool' Booth.

Hits? W-A-Y too many to mention! Consult the track listing!
Bear Family 2014 CD 22.00 €
VA: - Sweet Soul Music 1972
1-CD Digipak (6-plated) with 76-page booklet, 26 tracks. Total playing time approx. 85 mns.

• The eagerly anticipated finale to Bear Family's earlier ‘Sweet Soul Music’ volumes, and the award-winning 'Blowin' The Fuse' R&B series.
• Taken together, these classic series tell the story of R&B-Soul-Funk from 1945-1975, year-by-year, song-by-song. These are the records that made a difference. A HUGE difference!
• This is the sound that still influences today’s R&B and Soul and Rap, plus musicians like Amy Winehouse and Janelle Monae and revivalists like James Hunter, who weren’t even born when these records came out!
• All the greatest and most influential soul-funk hits of the early 1970s, including some surprisingly hard-to-find selections! Every song is the original version, painstakingly remastered for finest sound!
• Massive, beautifully illustrated booklets with detailed notes, incredible vintage photos, and ephemera.
• But, sadly, the story ends here. The last track, Boogie Fever, heralds the dawn of Disco.

As Soul morphed into Funk, it became the soundtrack to a social and musical revolution. The riveting story of the 1960s in Soul music was told in full for the first time on Bear Family's earlier 'Sweet Soul Music' volumes. Now the story continues to our conclusion in 1975. Some record companies have compiled anthologies from their own vaults, but Bear Family has gone the extra mile... and then some, licensing classic recordings from EVERY record label at the epicenter of ‘70s soul and funk to arrive at the ultimate collection of greatest hits and finest performances from the era’s biggest stars and neglected heroes.

The final five volumes, available now, cover the years 1971-1975. The music was changing rapidly thanks to Motown, Stax, Muscle Shoals, and the funk revolution, led by James Brown and Sly & The Family Stone. The messages at the heart of the music were often as powerful and incendiary as the grooves themselves. Bill Dahl’s track-by-track commentary provides extensive biographical info on every artist on every disc.

The prelude to this series, 'Blowin' The Fuse,' definitively covered the history of R&B from 1945- 1960, garnering awards and wide acclaim. The first ten volumes of ‘Sweet Soul Music’ earned the same enthusiastic response. Now here comes the final installment of ‘Sweet Soul Music,’ compiled with love by Dave 'Daddy Cool' Booth.

Hits? W-A-Y too many to mention! Consult the track listing!
Bear Family 2014 CD 22.00 €
VA: - Sweet Soul Music 1973
1-CD Digipak (6-plated) with 76-page booklet, 26 tracks. Total playing time approx. 85 mns.

• The eagerly anticipated finale to Bear Family's earlier ‘Sweet Soul Music’ volumes, and the award-winning 'Blowin' The Fuse' R&B series.
• Taken together, these classic series tell the story of R&B-Soul-Funk from 1945-1975, year-by-year, song-by-song. These are the records that made a difference. A HUGE difference!
• This is the sound that still influences today’s R&B and Soul and Rap, plus musicians like Amy Winehouse and Janelle Monae and revivalists like James Hunter, who weren’t even born when these records came out!
• All the greatest and most influential soul-funk hits of the early 1970s, including some surprisingly hard-to-find selections! Every song is the original version, painstakingly remastered for finest sound!
• Massive, beautifully illustrated booklets with detailed notes, incredible vintage photos, and ephemera.
• But, sadly, the story ends here. The last track, Boogie Fever, heralds the dawn of Disco.

As Soul morphed into Funk, it became the soundtrack to a social and musical revolution. The riveting story of the 1960s in Soul music was told in full for the first time on Bear Family's earlier 'Sweet Soul Music' volumes. Now the story continues to our conclusion in 1975. Some record companies have compiled anthologies from their own vaults, but Bear Family has gone the extra mile... and then some, licensing classic recordings from EVERY record label at the epicenter of ‘70s soul and funk to arrive at the ultimate collection of greatest hits and finest performances from the era’s biggest stars and neglected heroes.

The final five volumes, available now, cover the years 1971-1975. The music was changing rapidly thanks to Motown, Stax, Muscle Shoals, and the funk revolution, led by James Brown and Sly & The Family Stone. The messages at the heart of the music were often as powerful and incendiary as the grooves themselves. Bill Dahl’s track-by-track commentary provides extensive biographical info on every artist on every disc.

The prelude to this series, 'Blowin' The Fuse,' definitively covered the history of R&B from 1945- 1960, garnering awards and wide acclaim. The first ten volumes of ‘Sweet Soul Music’ earned the same enthusiastic response. Now here comes the final installment of ‘Sweet Soul Music,’ compiled with love by Dave 'Daddy Cool' Booth.

Hits? W-A-Y too many to mention! Consult the track listing!
Bear Family 2014 CD 22.00 €
VA: - Sweet Soul Music 1974
1-CD Digipak (6-plated) with 76-page booklet, 26 tracks. Total playing time approx. 85 mns.

• The eagerly anticipated finale to Bear Family's earlier ‘Sweet Soul Music’ volumes, and the award-winning 'Blowin' The Fuse' R&B series.
• Taken together, these classic series tell the story of R&B-Soul-Funk from 1945-1975, year-by-year, song-by-song. These are the records that made a difference. A HUGE difference!
• This is the sound that still influences today’s R&B and Soul and Rap, plus musicians like Amy Winehouse and Janelle Monae and revivalists like James Hunter, who weren’t even born when these records came out!
• All the greatest and most influential soul-funk hits of the early 1970s, including some surprisingly hard-to-find selections! Every song is the original version, painstakingly remastered for finest sound!
• Massive, beautifully illustrated booklets with detailed notes, incredible vintage photos, and ephemera.
• But, sadly, the story ends here. The last track, Boogie Fever, heralds the dawn of Disco.

As Soul morphed into Funk, it became the soundtrack to a social and musical revolution. The riveting story of the 1960s in Soul music was told in full for the first time on Bear Family's earlier 'Sweet Soul Music' volumes. Now the story continues to our conclusion in 1975. Some record companies have compiled anthologies from their own vaults, but Bear Family has gone the extra mile... and then some, licensing classic recordings from EVERY record label at the epicenter of ‘70s soul and funk to arrive at the ultimate collection of greatest hits and finest performances from the era’s biggest stars and neglected heroes.

The final five volumes, available now, cover the years 1971-1975. The music was changing rapidly thanks to Motown, Stax, Muscle Shoals, and the funk revolution, led by James Brown and Sly & The Family Stone. The messages at the heart of the music were often as powerful and incendiary as the grooves themselves. Bill Dahl’s track-by-track commentary provides extensive biographical info on every artist on every disc.

The prelude to this series, 'Blowin' The Fuse,' definitively covered the history of R&B from 1945- 1960, garnering awards and wide acclaim. The first ten volumes of ‘Sweet Soul Music’ earned the same enthusiastic response. Now here comes the final installment of ‘Sweet Soul Music,’ compiled with love by Dave 'Daddy Cool' Booth.

Hits? W-A-Y too many to mention! Consult the track listing!
Bear Family 2014 CD 22.00 €
VA: - Sweet Soul Music 1975
1-CD Digipak (6-plated) with 76-page booklet, 26 tracks. Total playing time approx. 85 mns.

• The eagerly anticipated finale to Bear Family's earlier ‘Sweet Soul Music’ volumes, and the award-winning 'Blowin' The Fuse' R&B series.
• Taken together, these classic series tell the story of R&B-Soul-Funk from 1945-1975, year-by-year, song-by-song. These are the records that made a difference. A HUGE difference!
• This is the sound that still influences today’s R&B and Soul and Rap, plus musicians like Amy Winehouse and Janelle Monae and revivalists like James Hunter, who weren’t even born when these records came out!
• All the greatest and most influential soul-funk hits of the early 1970s, including some surprisingly hard-to-find selections! Every song is the original version, painstakingly remastered for finest sound!
• Massive, beautifully illustrated booklets with detailed notes, incredible vintage photos, and ephemera.
• But, sadly, the story ends here. The last track, Boogie Fever, heralds the dawn of Disco.

As Soul morphed into Funk, it became the soundtrack to a social and musical revolution. The riveting story of the 1960s in Soul music was told in full for the first time on Bear Family's earlier 'Sweet Soul Music' volumes. Now the story continues to our conclusion in 1975. Some record companies have compiled anthologies from their own vaults, but Bear Family has gone the extra mile... and then some, licensing classic recordings from EVERY record label at the epicenter of ‘70s soul and funk to arrive at the ultimate collection of greatest hits and finest performances from the era’s biggest stars and neglected heroes.

The final five volumes, available now, cover the years 1971-1975. The music was changing rapidly thanks to Motown, Stax, Muscle Shoals, and the funk revolution, led by James Brown and Sly & The Family Stone. The messages at the heart of the music were often as powerful and incendiary as the grooves themselves. Bill Dahl’s track-by-track commentary provides extensive biographical info on every artist on every disc.

The prelude to this series, 'Blowin' The Fuse,' definitively covered the history of R&B from 1945- 1960, garnering awards and wide acclaim. The first ten volumes of ‘Sweet Soul Music’ earned the same enthusiastic response. Now here comes the final installment of ‘Sweet Soul Music,’ compiled with love by Dave 'Daddy Cool' Booth.

Hits? W-A-Y too many to mention! Consult the track listing!
Bear Family 2014 CD 22.00 €
VA: - The Complete Fame Singles Vol. 1 1964-67
The Muscle Shoals music scene, and its pioneer Rick Hall, have received a lot of attention recently. The Muscle Shoals documentary film devoted a great deal of coverage to Hall’s work and in January 2014 the Grammy committee presented him with a Special Merit award. Only a man with such great talent could have made a one-track country town in Alabamaan important centre of the American recording industry. As a tribute to his outstanding legacy, we are releasing the first volume in our “The Complete Fame Singles” series.

Hall opened Fame Recording Studios in 1961. Arthur Alexander’s timeless single, ‘You Better Move On’ b/w ‘A Shot Of Rhythm and Blues’ – a big hit on Dot and a monumental influence on a generation of UK musicians, was the first of many hits recorded at Fame. At first Hall hired out the studio to producers such as Ray Stevens and Bill Lowery who wanted to take advantage of his crack studio band and his engineering skills. He also issued a few records by local acts on the R and H or Fame labels and leased out other masters to larger imprints for national distribution. When he found Jimmy Hughes, who he hoped would follow Arthur Alexander as his star act, he licensed ‘I’m Qualified’ to Jamie-Guyden in Philadelphia. Only when he failed to place Hughes’ follow-up with a national company was he forced to start Fame as a serious label, helped by Dan Penn, his main songwriter and right-hand man in the studio. This is the point where our collection begins.

The single was the southern soul masterpiece ‘Steal Away’. Following Hall and Penn’s early attempts at promotion, the record was picked up by Vee-Jay for national distribution. On the back of a Top 20 Pop hit and a #2 position on Cash Box’s R&B chart, Vee-Jay demanded more material from Hughes and signed a distribution deal for the Fame label. Fame attempted to repeat Jimmy Hughes’ success and issued a selection of records from musicians who formed the team around Rick Hall.

On this first of three volumes, we follow the development of the great songwriting team of Dan Penn and Spooner Oldham and hear the records made during the years 1964 to 1967. Many failed to make a mark, as much of the label’s early period was devoted to finding out what route would lead to success. By the end of the second disc, Clarence Carter is established as the label’s main star, distribution has switched to Atlantic and the Fame label’s path is set. The 52 tracks here tell this fascinating story.

By Dean Rudland (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2014 CD 25.00 €
VA: - Without The Beatles 2CD
During February, 2014 America celebrated the 50th anniversary of 'The British Invasion' when The Beatles appeared on The Ed Sullivan TV Show and changed the course of pop music forever.

Although American teenagers embraced The Beatles sound as a new and exciting genre of music, it was initially based on US rock and roll. So across this 2CD set we present 50 original classics of US rock and roll, pop, R&B and soul recordings that The Beatles would later go on to cover and sell back to America.

Artists include: Little Richard; Carl Perkins; The Everly Brothers; The Isley Brothers; Buddy Holly; Chuck Berry; Elvis Presley, Eddie Cochran and more!

Fully detailed liner notes.
Jasmine Records 2014 CD 15.00 €
Billy Storm - This Is The Nite
From wild rockers to pop, and from early soul dancers to classic group harmony songs, Billy Storm was able to perform all those styles and more. Always with a top notch tenor voice that could scream Little Richard and send cold chills like Clyde McPhatter. This anthology of most of his best recordings will show you all this and even more. It was time to have a career spanning album of Storm starting way back on the beginning of his career arriving to the early days of soul music. You are going to love it!
El Toro Records 2013 CD 15.00 €
Bobby Bland - Here's The Man LP + CD
180 gram vinyl LP featuring a free bonus CD of the album, so that you can have the "analog" and the "digital" for the price of one. BEAT THAT !

Here's The Man! was originall yreleased in 1962 on Duke Recoreds - Houston's legendary R&B label run by the infamous Don Robey - and is the second LP from Bobby "Blue" Bland. Featuring one of his most enduring and classic hits, "Turn On Your Love Light", along with 10 other smoking R&B numbers - Here's The Man! is a fine showcase of one of the most influential and important R&B / soul albums of the 1960s. Essential !
Doxy Music 2013 LP 22.00 €
Booker T & The MGs Meet The Mark-Keys - Memphis Soul Beat 2CD
Featured over these two CDs is the first flowering of the 'Stax' sound, a sound that would develop throughout the '60s to become one of the most predominant sounds of American R&B and soul around the world.

Included are three complete albums, two from The Mar-Keys and one from Booker T & The MGs plus bonus singles. These were the first acts to break on Stax Records with hits like, 'Last Night' and 'Green Onions'.

Here then are three of the earliest albums released out of Jim Stewart and Estelle Axton's legendary label and the genesis of one of the most important house bands in recording history.

Fully detailed liner notes with career achievements and history.
Jasmine Records 2013 CD 15.00 €
Booker T. & The MG's - The Memphis Soul Sound Of
Vinyl Passion 2013 LP 13.00 €
Carla Thomas - Sweet Sweetheart
When my Ace colleagues Roger Armstrong and Peter Gibbon began combing the Stax vaults for unreleased recordings in the 1990s, they were both pleased and surprised by how much material was available and how good it was. In the case of Carla Thomas, they found themselves surrounded by a stockpile of more than 75 unissued masters, plus a considerable number of fine alternate takes of familiar classics. As soon as they returned to the UK and began compiling CDs from these vault goodies, they wasted little time in assembling two dozen tracks for a CD titled “Hidden Gems”, while further titles appeared on the various artists CD “You Thrill My Soul” and across the “Volts Of Stax” series.

“Sweet Sweetheart” is a somewhat belated, but very welcome, sequel to “Hidden Gems”. Like its predecessor, it contains more than 20 previously unissued tracks from the 1960s, including a complete lost album Carla cut under the supervision of Chips Moman at Memphis’ American Studios. Only two of the tracks from the album, both included here, were issued as a single in September 1970. It flopped, and the tapes for the rest of the album were consigned to the shelf.

Listening to the complete album now, it’s hard to see why this should have been so. Chips’ production is first rate, as are Carla’s singing and the sympathetic accompaniment of American’s crack line-up of musicians. The songs are chosen with care, and to reflect Carla’s desire to stretch her musical boundaries a little as she moved into her second decade as a recording artist. Many of them were written by Chips’ wife Toni Wine and other noted New York tunesmiths such as Irwin Levine, L Russell Brown, Carole King and Gerry Goffin. Still more came from the catalogues of such diverse talents as the Bee Gees, Ray Stevens, James Taylor andUKrockers Free’s Paul Rodgers and Andy Fraser. It should have been the album to take Carla’s career to the next level, but the Stax A&R department had other ideas and binned it.

The American sessions are bolstered by 12 additional cuts, all recorded at Stax between late 1964 and early 1968. All the songs are new to Carla’s catalogue, with the exception of ‘B-A-B-Y’ (heard here in its initial take) and a slow and sultry version of Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil’s ‘Good Good Loving’ (first heard in a more up-tempo style on “Hidden Gems”). These tracks are as good as anything Stax released on Carla in the mid 60s, and in several cases they are better. Lovers of deeper southern soul will particularly delight to ‘Stop By Here’, ‘Problems’ and Carla’s take on ‘Crying All By Myself’, most familiar to Stax fans via William Bell’s fantastic version.

By Tony Rounce (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 CD 25.00 €
Clarence Carter - The Fame Singles Vol. 2 1970-73
The second volume of Clarence Carter’s Fame singles opens with his biggest worldwide hit. A cover of a Chairman Of The Board album track, ‘Patches’ is a song that could be considered a corny attempt to capture the heartstrings. In fact Clarence initially refused to record it. He regarded a song about rural poverty as a slight upon his people, while producer Rick Hall thought it could apply equally to black and white Americans. Hall won, and the record climbed into the Top 10 of the pop charts on both sides of the Atlantic.

The first part of this compilation sees the search for another hit of similar magnitude lead Clarence further away from his black southern audience. Over the previous four years he had progressed from a promising newcomer with gritty masterpieces such as ‘Tell Daddy’ and ‘Looking For A Fox’ to a million-selling hit-maker with ‘Slip Away’ and ‘Too Weak To Fight’, all cut for Fame and released on Atlantic Records. A string of Top 10 R&B hits made him one ofAtlantic’s most successful soul artists.

After ‘Patches’, his next couple of singles looked to replicate the story-telling framework. ‘It’s All In Your Mind’ and ‘The Court Room’ were nothing short of excellent, but the public didn’t take to them. With Fame’s relationship with Atlantic not as warm as it had been, Clarence’s singles started to under-perform, to the point where his duet with his wife Candi Staton didn’t even chart. His records were subsequently released on Fame via their new deal with United Artists and began to reappear in the higher reaches of the R&B chart.

This CD features the A and B-sides of the 11 singles scheduled for release by Clarence until the end of 1973, including many tracks that have never been reissued on CD before. It is a fantastic selection of classic southern soul, highlighting one of the greatest talents and biggest stars to have recorded for Rick Hall’s venerated Fame label.

By Dean Rudland (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 CD 18.00 €
Dan Penn - The Fame Recordings 2LP
Pressed on 180g mulberry-coloured vinyl in heavy-duty gatefold sleeve

“At last” was the most frequent response to Ace’s long-awaited CD anthology of southern soul songsmith Dan Penn’s early 1960s sessions at Fame in Muscle Shoals. The long-rumoured but rarely heard gems contained within proved to be every bit as good as the privileged few who had heard them had claimed. Penn’s searing interpretations of self-penned classics such as ‘It Tears Me Up’, ‘Rainbow Road’ and ‘You Left The Water Running’ make a very strong case for the man as one of the truly great blue-eyed soul voices.

Now the spectacular contents of “The Fame Recordings” are available as a deluxe two LP set as part of Ace’s high quality vinyl release schedule. Programmed for maximum playability, in this format the package truly approximates a great lost southern vintage pop and soul album, with each compelling performance spilling from the grooves. As a gift for the soul fan in your life, or as a treat for yourself, “The Fame Recordings” LP set is not to be missed.

By Alec Palao (Ace Records)


Ace Records 2013 LP 32.00 €
Darrel Banks - I'm The One Who Loves You
Darrell Banks was one of the great soul voices, despite a tragically short recording career that lasted less than four years and embraced a mere seven singles and two albums. The news of previously unheard material by him will be especially exciting for lovers of both Detroit and Memphis soul. Our CD of his complete surviving Volt recordings features the 11 tracks from his Volt album, “Here To Stay”, and eight bonus titles, including four unissued demos from his final recording session in December 1969. Most of the tracks from “Here To Stay” have never been out on an Ace before, making news of their release here all the more exciting.

By Tony Rounce (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 CD 18.00 €
David Porter - Gritty, Groovy & Gettin' It.. and more
1970’s “Gritty, Groovy, & Getting’ It” was the first of singer-songwriter David Porter’s four Enterprise albums. Produced by his most famous writing partner Isaac Hayes, it’s a delightful and often overlooked set, chock-full of imaginative revivals of some of David’s favourite R&B hits. It also includes a sultry remake of ‘Can’t See You When I Want To’, his rare debut Stax release from 1965, the original version of which is included as a bonus track. Those who shy away from Hayes’ marathon workouts on his own albums will be pleased to note that the running times of most of David’s tracks do not exceed four minutes mark, and the interesting rearrangements of Jerry Butler’s ‘I’m A-Tellin’ You’ and Gene Chandler’s ‘Just Be True’ really do put a fresh spin on some proven 60s soul classics.
Ace Records 2013 CD 18.00 €
Etta James - Etta Is Betta Than Evvah With Bonus Tracks
Released in 1976, “Etta Is Betta Than Evvah!” was the final album of Etta James’ tumultuous 16-year tenure at Chess Records. The album is issued here on CD for the first time, together with 10 bonus titles from the mid-70s.

The self-produced opener, ‘Woman (Shake Your Booty)’, is a funky rewrite of a song Etta had recorded, as ‘W.O.M.A.N’, for Modern in 1955 and again for Chess in 1971. Etta’s road band, led by guitarist Brian Ray, backed her on the track. Two other titles on the LP, ‘Only A Fool’ and Randy Newman’s ‘Leave Your Hat On’, had been released previously on 1973’s “Etta James” set, produced by Gabriel Mekler, celebrated for his work with Steppenwolf, Janis Joplin and others.

By 1976 Chess Records had been purchased by All Platinum, at whose New Jersey studio the bulk of “Etta Is Betta Than Evvah!” was recorded with former Motown baritone sax hero Mike Terry producing. The players on the sessions were the All Platinum house band, otherwise known as funk/disco hitmakers the Rimshots. ‘Little Bit Of Love’ and ‘I’ve Been A Fool’ were penned by Freddie Beckmeier, the bass player with Etta’s own band. The remainder of the album comprised well-chosen covers of Ann Peebles’ ‘A Love Vibration’, ‘Groove Me’ (King Floyd), ‘Blinded By Love’ (Johnny Winter), ‘Jump Into Love’ (Rufus) and ‘Ain’t No Pity In The Naked City’ (Pat Lundy).

None of the tracks Etta recorded in Philadelphia in 1973 were released at the time but a few have surfaced in recent years, among them her revival of ‘You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feelin’’, the first of our bonus selections.

Next up are three more tracks from the “Etta James” album. Written by Tracy Nelson, who recorded the song with her group Mother Earth in 1968, and featuring a string arrangement by the great Jimmie Haskell, ‘Down So Low’ was described by Etta in her autobiography as “the hardest song I ever tried to sing in my life”. Haskell also supplied the edgy string lines on ‘All The Way Down’. ‘God’s Song (That’s Why I Love Mankind)’ was one of three Randy Newman songs on the album.

Etta’s 1974 LP, “Come A Little Closer”, is the source of the next five bonus selections. Six songs on the LP, including the title track and the wordless ‘Feeling Uneasy’, were co-written by Gabriel Mekler, who likely also influenced Etta to cut Steppenwolf’s ‘Power Play’. Mekler had plans to make a television film about Bessie Smith with Etta in the lead role. The project never materialised but did yield her Grammy-nominated recording of ‘St. Louis Blues’. Confirming her affinity with the songs of Randy Newman, Etta wrote, “The song I loved singing most, though, was ‘Let’s Burn Down The Cornfield’.”

The final bonus track is a version of Tom Jans’ yearning country ballad ‘Lovin’ Arms’, the only recording ever to be released from Etta’s her shelved 1974 sessions with producer Jerry Wexler.



By Mick Patrick (Ace Records)

Ace Records 2013 CD 18.00 €
George Jackson - Old Friend - The Fame Recordings Vol. 3
The death of George Jackson earlier this year was both a surprise and a shock to all of us at Ace – particularly to Dean Rudlandand yours truly, who have been so involved in the issue of his recordings over the past few years. Having met George and enjoyed his company only a couple of years ago, Dean and I found it especially hard to believe that this charming man, who made us feel as if we’d known him all our lives would no longer be part of soul music’s future.

Fortunately he left behind many great songs to remember him by and a quite formidable stockpile of his own recordings of those songs. Kent’s earlier CDs of George’s recordings hold their own with any of the Southern soul compilations of the last 25 years. Sad as it is that George isn’t here to see our programme through to its conclusion, we’re happy that there is still much more to come from this supremely talented man.

“Old Friend”, the third volume of George’s Fame recordings, is possibly the best of the three we’ve issued to date. There are a handful of songs which will be familiar via the versions of other acts. Unlike the first two, however, most of the tracks were recorded by George alone. Nevertheless these predominantly-unheard songs – some of which were written by George’s friends and peers O B McClinton and Dan Greer – are just as strong as those covered by Candi Staton, Clarence Carter, Wilson Pickett et al. All would surely have been hits for anyone who did pick them from George’s massive catalogue of potential hits.

The fabulous musicianship of the second and third,Muscle Shoalsbased Fame rhythm sections is all over the majority of these recordings – including, on a couple of cuts, the stinging guitar work of Duane Allman. None of our featured tracks has appeared on CD before, which makes their presence here all the more vital; all but two have never been issued before. It’s a real pleasure to be able to keep George Jackson’s name alive with music of outstanding quality.

By Tony Rounce (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 CD 18.00 €
George Jackson - The Fame Sessions
Ah, the joy of vinyl – especially the new Ace Records high quality releases. The 180 gram test pressing landed on my desk with a thump and, once placed on the deck, the needle was placed on the first groove with a satisfying thrum. So you can only imagine how much better the experience got as the sound of Fame’s classic house band of David Hood, Jimmy Johnson, Barry Beckett and Roger Hawkins emerged from the speakers. They were behind George Jackson as he demonstrated the power of a new song he had written. Any fan of Southern Soul will know that ‘I’m Just A Prisoner’ became a classic for Candi Staton but, as we have proved time and again over the last few years, George Jackson was more than capable of delivering his own songs.

Mississippi-born, George had his first break in music working alongside Dan Greer at Goldwax Records in Memphis, writing songs and releasing a single in a duet with Dan. In 1967 he auditioned at Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals, where proprietor Rick Hall was looking to replace his top writer Dan Penn, who had moved to Memphis the previous year. In George, Rick found someone who not only wrote prolifically but could sing as well. As an artist, George released two singles on the Fame label and one more Fame-recorded side on Verve. However, it is quite likely that no-one wanted him to be too successful in that role, because his songs were far too important for Fame’s star artists and others who passed through the studio looking for some Muscle Shoals magic. In short order, he wrote hits for Candi Staton, Wilson Pickett, Clarence Carter and then turned out a #1 for the Osmonds.

However, George wrote more songs than he could place with other artists and he also recorded non-stop. Over two CD volumes we have showcased his Fame recordings and we are now proud to present you with his first ever vinyl album from these sessions. In the style of a classic late 60s or early 70s soul album, it features 12 stunning tracks, two of which are (for now) exclusive to this release. It’s difficult to pick out favourites but I have a lot of time for ‘I Bit Off More Than I Can Chew’ (which we’ve discovered was written with James Govan in mind) and ‘Get It When I Want It’, another track written for Candi Staton. Of the new tracks, ‘Add A Little Sunshine’ and ‘That From The Heart’ are more than worthy additions to the George Jackson canon.



By Dean Rudland (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 LP 23.00 €
Johnny Copeland - It's Me - Classic Texas Soul 1965-72 2CD
At the time of his death 15 years ago, Johnny Copeland was regarded as one of the world’s premier blues artists, a Grammy-winner with a strong body of work behind him. Success had come late, preceded by almost 30 years of working hard to make a living. In those years he recorded extensively, building a catalogue of 45s that did little to advance his career, despite their unbridled excellence. Many of those 45s fell into the hands of appreciative soul and blues collectors around the world, establishing Johnny as a cult hero whose work was always worth a listen.

Johnny had been working for a decade when he entered into a professional relationship with producer Huey Meaux in 1964, but it wasn’t until he came under Huey’s wing that his records found their way beyond Texas and onto bigger labels. Huey recognised Johnny’s talent and recorded him extensively. The records they made together form the basis of this important new 2CD set.

“It’s Me” is the most comprehensive collection of Johnny’s mid-60s to early 70s recordings ever assembled. Here you’ll find Huey Meaux-produced Wand, Suave, Jet Stream, Boogaloo and Wet Soul singles, material Johnny either sold to or cut directly for Kent-Modern in the early 1970s, two rare duets he recorded with South Texas R&B heroine Miss La Vell White as Johnny & Lilly, sides submitted to Wand for a proposed album that never happened, previously undocumented songs, and some fabulous vocal/guitar demos, some of which have never been issued before. None have ever sounded better than they do here, thanks to extensive vault research undertaken by me and my colleague Alec Palao in 2012. (Due to the disappearance or deterioration of a few tapes, fresh dubs were made and remastered from scratch.)

I first heard Johnny Copeland when my old pal Tony Cummings sat me down and played me ‘Dedicated To The Greatest’ almost 45 years ago. The power and soul in his voice made me an immediate fan. It’s been a true honour to work on a project that at last puts this classic material into the context it’s always deserved.



By Tony Rounce (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 CD 25.00 €
King Curtis - Do Your Thing
Wounded Bird Records 2013 CD 17.00 €
King Floyd - I Feel Like Dynamite - The Early Chimneyville Singles
Spread across a handful of records spearheaded by King Floyd’s ‘Groove Me’, a new sound in soul appeared in late 1970 that put Jackson, Mississippi’s Malaco Studios on the recording map, seemingly overnight. The Malaco Sound might have felt like it came out of nowhere, but it was the end product of hard graft and some disappointment along the road to success.

After ‘Groove Me’ had been rejected by many important soul labels, Malaco put it out themselves, initially as a B-side. A New Orleans-based DJ went crazy for the track and began plugging it mercilessly. The record soon busted out of the south and, with national distribution by Atlantic Records, became a #1R&B/#5 Pop smash in early 1971. The record established Malaco, their Chimneyville label and former mailman King Floyd at a stroke, paving the way for more hit singles and two extremely good albums over the next four years.

For the first time on a UK CD, those singles and the best album tracks are collected here on “I Feel Like Dynamite”. The compilation contains all of Floyd’s important dance hits, several of which have been sampled by hip hoppers over and over again, plus the great deep soul sides that were a highlight of his albums and B-sides. For those who have known tracks such as ‘Please Don’t Leave Me Lonely’ and ‘Handle With Care’ for years, but who have never owned them on CD, these and others like them will be a welcome addition to their collections. For those who have never heard them before, they will be a revelation.

When ‘Groove Me’ was first released, I was working in a record shop in South West London, selling 45s mostly to a young West Indian and African crowd. For many weeks it seemed like nobody who came into the shop left without a copy. We sold out our initial batch of import copies of the single within a few seconds of the needle hitting the vinyl for the first time. In my mind’s eye I can still see a Pavlovian show of hands from eager purchasers, standing up to six-deep at the counter, every time I hear the intro of ‘Groove Me’.

40 years on, ‘Groove Me’ and other great King Floyd hits such as ‘Baby Let Me Kiss You’, ‘Woman Don’t Go Astray’ and our title track sound just as original and vital as they did when they were first released.

By Tony Rounce (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 CD 18.00 €
Martha And The Vandellas - Dance Party
Universal Music Japan 2013 CD 15.00 €
Marvelettes - Detroit's Darlings 1961-1962
The Marvelettes were Tamla Motown's first great female group predating The Supremes and The Vandellas by several years.

Here we have their first three LPs, Please Mr Postman; Smash Hits and Playboy which funnily enough include a hit about begging a postman for a letter, 'Playboy' and 'Beechwood 4-5789'.

This is Motown magic from the label's early days!

Fully detailed liner notes with career achievements and history.
Jasmine Records 2013 CD 13.00 €
Mary Wells - Bye Bye Baby
Jasmine is proud to present the first lady of Motown, Mary Wells with this wonderful compilation of sublime early Motown hits and recordings.

Features 1961's 'Bye, Bye Baby/I Don't Want to Take a Chance' and 1962's 'The One Who Really Loves You' and four bonus singles which include the R&B No. 1 'Two Lovers'.

Other hits include: 'Bye Bye Baby'; 'The One Who Really Knows' and 'You Beat Me to the Punch'.

These recordings led The Beatles to invite her onto their first US tour and a few years later inspired the early beat groups that led to the British invasion.
Jasmine Records 2013 CD 12.00 €
Mary Wells - Bye Bye Baby - I Don't want to take a Chance
originally released 1963
Rumble Records 2013 LP 18.00 €
Mary Wells - Sings My Guy
originally issued 1964
Motown Record Corp 2013 LP 25.00 €
Milt Jackson & Ray Charles - Soul Brothers
Vinylogy 2013 LP 15.00 €
Miracles with Smokey Robinson - You Can Depend On Them 1959-1962 2CD
3 LPs PLUS BONUS SINGLES

The first three albums by The Miracles plus all the 45s released through to 1962 in one package representing the beginning of one of the greatest and most influential groups in history.

Among the many great tracks this superb 2CD set features, 'Who's Lovin' You' which is now one of the group's most famous songs after being recorded by The Jackson Five and is now becoming a staple track for American Idol contestants. Plus let us not forget 'You Really Got a Hold on Me' which of course The Beatles recorded the following year on their second LP.

Fully detailed liner notes.
Jasmine Records 2013 CD 15.00 €
Nikki Hill & Deke Dickerson With The Bo-Keys - Soul Meets Country CDEP
This phenomenal release will surprise fans of both Deke and Nikki—pure Southern-fried soul recorded at Scott Bomar's Electraphonic Studios in Memphis with the mighty Bo-Keys band!

Two duets, "Lovey Dovey" and "Feelins," coupled with a powerful rocker from Nikki, "Struttin'" and Deke's awesome new wah-wah funk version (featuring Motown's Dennis Coffey on guitar!) of "Lady Killin' Papa" from his first album, now titled "Lady Killin' Killa." The CD comes with a gatefold cover with extra pictures.
Major Label Records 2013 CD 8.00 €
Nikki Hill & Deke Dickerson With The Bo-Keys - Soul Meets Country EP
This phenomenal release will surprise fans of both Deke and Nikki—pure Southern-fried soul recorded at Scott Bomar's Electraphonic Studios in Memphis with the mighty Bo-Keys band!

Two duets, "Lovey Dovey" and "Feelins," coupled with a powerful rocker from Nikki, "Struttin'" and Deke's awesome new wah-wah funk version (featuring Motown's Dennis Coffey on guitar!) of "Lady Killin' Papa" from his first album, now titled "Lady Killin' Killa." The vinyl comes with a free download card, pressed on gold vinyl.
Major Label Records 2013 Single/EP 8.00 €
Otis Redding - The Complete Stax / Volt Singles Collection 3CD
Every Stax, Volt & Atco 45s. 70 tracks on 3 CDs including hits and B-sides in its original, speaker-rattling mono mix, many on CD for the first time.
Shout 2013 CD-Box 50.00 €
Solomon Burke - Soul Arrives! 1955-1961
Jasmine Records 2013 CD 12.00 €
Supremes - I Hear A Symphony
Music On Vinyl 2013 LP 22.00 €
Supremes - Meet The Supremes
recorded in Detroit 1960-1962

180 gram vinyl

free mp3 album download
WaxTime Records 2013 LP 18.00 €
Supremes - Meet The Supremes
Hallmark Music 2013 CD 6.00 €
Tommy Hunt - A Sign Of The Times- The Spark Recordings 1975-1976
Shout Records 2013 CD 18.00 €
Ty Karim - Wear Your Natural, Baby
With the resurgence of vinyl, Kent has returned to its extensive back catalogue and conjured up a sultry soul stomper of an LP from Ty Karim. It features all her famed dancefloor favourites from the exciting and super-rare 60s single ‘You Just Don’t Know’ and smooth 70s soul floater ‘Lightin’ Up’ to the hipper-than-hip call to ‘Wear Your Natural, Baby’, which from the fabulous cover photo we can see Ty did with style.

There are a couple of slower, soulful moments in the shape of the haunting big beat ballad ‘All At Once’ and the unlikely, yet successful, cover of James Taylor’s ‘Don’t Let Me Be Lonely Tonight’. It’s the first time on vinyl for the bluesy ‘Don’t Make Me Do Wrong’ and Ty’s solo version of ‘If I Can’t Stop You (I Can Slow You Down)’, which is going to please DJs. Those guys will already have the universally acclaimed ‘Wear Your Natural, Baby’ on Romark or Kent but will they be able to resist this perfect package?

By Ady Croasdell (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 LP 25.00 €
VA: - A Deep Dip Into Carolina Soul Vol. 1
Soul From The Vaults 2013 CD 15.00 €
VA: - Dave Godin's Deep Soul Treasures Taken From The Vaults
Ace Records 2013 LP 25.00 €
VA: - Era Northern Soul
Herb Newman’s Era Label was well established in Los Angeles by the time the soul era came about. With over 150 singles behind him by the time our musical story starts in 1962, Herb was a record label veteran. Originally more at home with straight pop records, Herb only occasionally dabbled in black music.

Era’s biggest hit by a black singer was Jewel Akens’ ‘The Birds And The Bees’, which was pure pop but came out of a notable session by accomplished soul group the Turn Arounds. Two great sides by the group feature here, along with the full story behind that hit. But Akens could sing soul as well as pop; a great late 60s stomper, ‘Your Good Lovin’’, written and produced by Eddie Daniels, debuts on this CD. We also found a little-known New Breed R&B gem from one of Jewel’s more obscure groups, the Composers.

Herb Newman already had a future soul star on his roster in the young Brenda Holloway who recorded as half of the Soul-Mates earlier in 1963. A track by the Lovemates, another boy/girl duo featuring Brenda, is also included, along with her 1964 solo outing for Catch.

Another future soul chart-maker was Jimmy Lewis who had just one Era release, arranged by Northern Soul hero James Carmichael. Jesse Davis’ ‘Gonna Hang On In There Girl’ was a rare soulful departure for the nightclub singer but the Sherlie Matthews composition sounds awesome when blasted out of the speakers at Northern gatherings. Wigan (and elsewhere) favourites are provided by Othello Robertson’s ‘So In Luv’ and Billy Watkins’ ‘The Ice-Man’ and there are alternate versions of ‘A Slice Of The Pie’ and ‘Meet Me At Midnight’, each arguably better than the Jewel Akens and Cindy Lynn originals.

Further unissued manna comes from the H.B. Barnum-arranged ‘Dance With Me’ by Billy Watkins and excellent alternate readings of ‘Stand There Mountain’ and ‘The Blue Shadow’ by ex-vocal group singer Vince Howard; Herb Newman had previously cut the songs on pop acts. There are Popcorn classics from the very colourful Bruce Cloud (check out the sleevenotes on him) and the glamorous and equally newsworthy Carol Connors. Both sides of Steve Flanagan’s Stafford monster ‘I’ve Arrived’ sound great alongside Melvin Boyd’s killer version of ‘Exit Loneliness, Enter Love’, produced by Miles Grayson. We throw light on Steve Flanagan’s identity but are still scouring the internet for Melvin Boyd.

Although Era started out a million miles away from black music, by the late 60s it had embraced it and utilised some of its most accomplished talents.

By Ady Croasdell (Ace Records)
Ace Records 2013 CD 18.00 €
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